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Michele Sicca Grant Recipients

2019-20

Manuel Berduc (History)

Title: "The Peripatetic Underground: Transnational Terrorism, Biological Socialism, and Literature in Fin-de-Siècle Revolutionary Practice"

Abstract: This work looks at the life of a Russian terrorist whose trajectory as a revolutionary, a biologist, a painter, and writer allows us to reconstruct various social and intellectual threads that made up a transnational world of expropriative anarchism from Russia, through Europe, to Argentina that formed the most popular strain of revolutionary Socialism before the October Russian Revolution.

Mary Danisi (Classics)

Title: "Putting Back the Sacred in Sacred Spaces: Recovering the Dynamism of Ancient Sanctuaries"

Abstract: As a graduate student interested in researching ancient Greek cult practices, Mary will use funding from the Sicca/Manon Grant Program to support summer travel to European collections featuring artifacts from major excavations of ancient Greek sanctuaries. Specifically, she will examine sacred objects dedicated to deities in order to further my understanding of Greek rituals transacted between mortals and gods. Exposure to museum collections containing objects of this sort will increase her awareness of the diversity of material evidence available for further analysis that she could investigate during her A-exams and in other preparations for her dissertation.

Naomi Egel (Government)

Title: "Regulating the Weapons of War"

Abstract: Why do states pursue multilateral arms control agreements to ban or limit the weapons they use, especially when powerful states oppose such initiatives? Previous scholarship has focused largely on US-led initiatives, but fails to explain why states have pursued multilateral arms control initiatives without US leadership. This produces a serious selection bias in attempting to understand the dynamics of arms control. Naomi's dissertation explores the politics of multilateral arms control agreements with leadership from both powerful and weaker states to develop a comprehensive explanation for the pursuit and design of multilateral arms control agreements. To do so, I develop a theory of different motivations for regulation and test it using a multimethod research design involving process tracing of three case studies (the 1967 Outer Space Treaty, the 1980 Convention on Conventional Weapons, and the 2017 Nuclear Ban Treaty) and quantitative text analysis of all multilateral arms control agreements since 1945. She hypothesizes that powerful states employ arms control to advance stability between great powers and preserving their own freedom of action, even as they agree to limit the weapons they use. In contrast, states with small militaries and little involvement in the production and use of these weapons pursue arms control to limit the damage caused by these weapons and to bind powerful states. These different goals, she hypothesizes, lead to fundamental differences in the design of the resultant agreements, and what they are intended to accomplish. Understanding why different states pursue multilateral arms control agreements and how this affects the design of the agreement can help scholars and policymakers better assess the success and failure of different initiatives.

Marc  Kohlbry (Comparative Literature)

Title: "Noise Index: The Emergence and Limits of Cybernetic Poiēsis"

Abstract: Cybernetics—the science of communication and control and precursor to modern computing, the Internet, and AI—is rarely thought alongside of literature. Yet to silo these two realms would be a mistake, for nowhere were the linguistic, technological, and political consequences of the cybernetic model of communication questioned more thoroughly than in the realm of avant-garde French literature. Accordingly, this project draws connections between the various dimensions of “cybernetic” communication and cultural production in France between 1948 and 1970. In doing so, it investigates how specific novels, poems, and radio plays might be considered as independent extensions of the cybernetic paradigm of communication that in their specificity think, interrogate, develop, or even subvert the complex relationship between language and late capitalism. More specifically, Marc ultimately argues that the concept of “noise” bridges the gap between the technical and literary formulations of communication. For while communication engineers often view noise as a nuisance to be eliminated, the writers considered here conceptualized it as the space and possibility of freedom. With this in mind, he asks the following questions of the “noise” of communication: If “noise” is the site from various avant-garde French writers launched their respective modes of literary production, what might their output tell us about the limits of literary communication? More generally, how might the scientific and mathematical modeling of communication limit our ability to create, innovate, or communicate to begin with? And how might the grey area of noise be used as a site for circumventing these restrictions? Finally, how could the other side of the cybernetic equation—control—be linked to these issues? Might the “noise” of communication also be a site that produces possibilities for control?

 

Kelly Moore (Romance Studies)

Title: "Anticlerical Violence and Sacral Transfers in Revolutionary Spain"

Abstract: Kelly's dissertation supplies a cultural history and critical reading of Spanish revolutionary anticlericalism (1936–1939) through close examination of the written and visual materials—worker’s periodicals, poetry, documentaries, film, and photographs—produced by anticlerical actors at the outset of the war. Combining literary and critical theory with empirical investigation, her project illuminates the relationship between political legitimacy and the transfers of sacrality that accompany secularization. She applied for the Sicca/Manon grant to conduct on-site archival work in Spain and the Netherlands during the summer of 2019. She will visit the Jovellanos Museum and Archive in Gijón, Spain, to access documents produced by the anarchist and socialist workers who performed a sacred translation ritual during the war. In addition, She will study the collections of photographs and other documents pertaining to anticlerical violence at the International Institute of Social History, the National Library of Spain, and Madrid’s Diocese Archives.

Ana Ozaki (Architecture)

Title: "'Black Atlantic' Architecture: Tropicalism and Resistance in the Architecture of the Afro-Latin Atlantic world"

Abstract: Associated with tropical and sustainable architectures is a technical adaptation of design to climate. Limited scholarship, however, traces them back to colonial processes. Ana's project looks at their genealogy, in which technoscience functioned as a tool in the production of a tropical architecture in the Lusophone world, more specifically in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Maputo, Mozambique, Lagos, Nigeria, and Macau. Tactics learned from Brazil would later be replicated in colonial Africa and Asia, under either a depoliticized experimentation by Portuguese modernists or as the outcome of diasporic identities of Afro-Latinx returnees, challenging the power relations established in the Transatlantic Slave Trade. Using Paul Gilroy’s “Black Atlantic” as a field of architectural history, this project dismantles diffusionist narratives that portray metropole-colony relationships as unidirectional flows and, at the same time, historicizing the "neutral" discourse associated with tropicalism in architecture in the context of Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa.

Ksenia Pavlenko (History)

Title: "Photography and Identity in Late Imperial Russia: How Image Making Formed National Myths"

Abstract: This project builds on existing research into how photography impacted identity in the twilight of imperial Russia. Photographic albums produced before 1917 reveal how a Slavic and Eastern Orthodox identity dominates the empire’s iconography, in turn clouding the diversity of the multi-cultural empire and oppressing communities by virtue of identity. This fabricated cultural homogeny is emblematic of how a despotic monarchy turned away from the realities of its lands in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Drawing on her work with the collections of the Metropolitan Museum’s Watson Library, New York Public Library, and the Library of Congress, Ksenia plans to travel to Saint Petersburg, Nizhniy Novgorod, and Ulyanovsk summer 2019 to examine both central archives and those that remain obscured. She will work with photographic resources unavailable in the United States and form a more nuanced picture of Eastern Europe, revealing cultural outlooks perpetuated in contemporary Russia.

Jacy Tackett (German Studies)

Title: "Science Fiction Literature in Postwar and Contemporary German Culture"

Abstract: To date, American science fiction studies has shown little interest in German culture. In her dissertation, “Experimental Literature and Science Fiction: Agency, Empathy, and Futurity in Postwar and Contemporary German Literature,” Jacy seeks to fill this gap in scholarship by investigating the emergence and persistence of science fiction in Postwar [1945-1989] and Contemporary [1989-present] German-language experimental and popular literature. In doing so, her project resists the long-held assumptions of American science fiction scholarship that German culture has made merely minor contributions to the genre, and in doing so, contributes to an expanded understanding of science fiction as such. She applied to the Michele Sicca Research Grant to conduct research for three chapters of her dissertation, for which she will draw on an extensive collection of fanzines at Die Phantastische Bibliothek in Wetzlar to investigate the cultural context surrounding the production of science fiction literature in Germany, as well as the “Future Life” project housed at Die Phantastische Bibliothek, which serves as an example of the continued impact of the genre for German politics culture. Her dissertation requires thorough engagement with Die Phantastische Bibliothek Wetzlar’s extensive collection of journals and fanzines and interviews with the “Future Life” library research team, which will allow her to cultivate a nuanced understanding of how the genre of science fiction was understood by its readers and how the impact of science fiction on society has changed over time, both of which are crucial for her project.

Previous years

 

2018-2019

Debak Das (Government) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for Dissertation Research for his proposal entitled “Operationalizing the Nuclear Deterrent: Regional Powers, Military Innovation, and Force Development.” With the aid of this grant, Das will be able to conduct early on-site research in the United Kingdom over the summer of 2018, in the hopes that his research will contribute to the understanding of how regional nuclear powers expand their nuclear force structures and ability to deliver their nuclear weapons. His research marks a shift from the traditional focus of International Relations scholarship on great power states.

Rukmini Chakraborty (History) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for Dissertation Research for her proposal entitled “Bailiffs, Brokers, and Brigantines’: Commercial Regulations, Colonial Maritime Law, and Making of the British Bay of Bengal.” With the aid of this grant, Chakraborty will be able to conduct archival research in the United Kingdom over the summer of 2018, in the hopes of contributing to the understanding of how European doctrines and legal precedents travelled and were translated, applied, and contested in quotidian commercial dealings in the Indian Ocean. She anticipates demonstrating how the normative conflicts within European traditions of international law, especially the continent-island divide, emerged as a critical malleable legal tool in the hands of Asian commercial subjects.

Laura Francis (English Language & Literature) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for Dissertation Research for her proposal entitled “Colonial Contexts: Early Modern Translations and the English Empire.” With the aid of this grant, Francis will be able to conduct early research in the libraries of Dublin, Ireland over the summer of 2018, in the hopes of contributing to the understanding of large networks of exchange with imperial rivals and colonial subjects that tempered the English literary tradition. More particularly, Francis will seek to uncover the historically-obscured perspectives between England, Ireland, and Spain necessary for situating her dissertation on early modern translations.

Kaja Tally-Schumacher (Ancient Art & Archaeology) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for Dissertation Research for her proposal entitled “Cultivating Empire: Transplanting and Translating Rome.” With the aid of this grant, Tally-Schumacher will be able to conduct research in Italy over the summer of 2018 for chapters three and four of her dissertation and her role as Project Manager in a Cornell-led excavation in ancient Pompeii. She hopes that her research will contribute to the reconceptualization of newly constructed gardens and garden representations in Rome in the first centuries BCE and CE as products of slave labor and as nurseries of imperialism. 

Shin Hwang (Musical Arts in Performance Practice) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for Dissertation Research for his proposal entitled “Lessons from Clara.” With the aid of this grant, Hwang will be able to conduct on-site archival research in Zwickau, Germany and London, the United Kingdom over the summer of 2018, in the hopes of gaining a broader understanding of Clara Schumann’s contributions to 19th century music. Hwang ultimately aims to use Schumann’s teachings to enrich the modern pianists’ understanding of the multifarious cultures of 19th century performance practices and to reveal the ways in which these lessons can be applied directly to the performance of nineteenth-century works today.

Julius Lagodny (Government) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for Dissertation Research for his proposal entitled “Why Migrants Vote for Far-Right Parties: Political Participation of Migrants in Austria and Germany.” With the aid of this grant, Lagodny will be able to conduct preliminary field research through semi-structured interviews with migrants and migrant organizations in Austria and Germany over the summer of 2018, in the hopes that his research will contribute to an explanation for migrant voting behaviors and, in particular, their striking tendency to vote for far-right parties.

2017-2018
Sena Aydin

Sena Aydin (Anthropology) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for Dissertation Research for her proposal entitled “Logics of Crisis in Barcelona, Spain: Everyday Economic Struggles and Grassroots Responses to the Neoliberal State”. With the aid of this grant, Sena will be able to spend a summer in Spain, in the hopes that her research will contribute to the understanding of how local actors---citizens, communities, state officials --respond to the debt crisis and how the crisis shapes practices of government agencies in Barcelona. 

Janelle Bourgeois

Janelle Bourgeois (History) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for Dissertation Research for her proposal entitled “Experiment, Race, and Slavery in the Settlement of French Guinea, 1700- 1848”.  With the aid of this grant, Janelle will be able to spend time in France and French Guiana, in hopes that her research will contribute to the understanding of economics and slavery in French and French Guinea and its subsequent ethical issues.

Conall Cash

Conall Cash (Romance Studies) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for Dissertation Research for his proposal entitled “Post-War French Marxism: Althusser and he Marxist Theory of History, 1960-1972”. With the aid of this grant, Conall will be able to spend four weeks in Paris, France, in the hopes that his research will contribute to the understanding of French Marxism and postwar political thought in France.

 

Alvaro Pascual

Alvaro Pascual (Casilian Language and Literature) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for Dissertation Research for his proposal entitled “Translation as Frontier in the XIII Century in Southern-Europe”. With the aid of this grant, Alvaro will be able to spend time in Spain, in the hopes that his research will contribute to the conceptualization of frontier in medieval Iberia.

 

Seth Korposki

Seth Korposki (English) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for Dissertation Research for his proposal entitled “Old Irish and the St Brendan Tradition”. With the aid of this grant, Seth will be able to spend 4 weeks in Ireland and the United Kingdom, in the hopes that his research will contribute to the knowledge of Irish language and literature and its subsequent impact of Anglo-Saxon and Norman-English cultures. 

Matthew Stoltz

Matthew Stoltz (German studies) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for Dissertation Research for his proposal entitled “Towards a Positive Faith: Religious Skepticism in German Letters, 1750-1800”. With the aid of this grant, Matthew will be able to spend a summer in Germany, in the hopes that his research will contribute to the knowledge of interplay between aesthetics, literature, and religion and how art is more efficacious than philosophy at spanning the antinomies of faith and reason.

 

Jacob Swanson

Jacob Swanson (government) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for Dissertation Research for his proposal entitled “Coining a Nation, Constituting a People”. With the aid of this grant, Jacob will be able to spend six weeks in the United Kingdom, in the hopes that his research will contribute to the role of national currency in the Constitution and British national identity. 

Samantha Wesner

Samantha Wesner (History) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for Dissertation Research for her proposal entitled “To Form a New People: Education and the Spread of Revolution During Jacobin Terror”. With the aid of this grant, Samantha will be able to spend six weeks in France, in hopes that her research will contribute to the understanding of education before the French revolution and its relationship with religion, government policies, and military actions.

 

2016-2017
Valeria Dani

Valeria Dani (Italian Studies and Literature) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for her dissertation research entitled “Ascensions and Downfalls in Italian Poetry and Jewish Mysticism.” With the help of this grant Valerie will be able to spend a few weeks in Jerusalem in hopes that her research will contribute towards the outline of a few configuration of the relationship between rhetoric and literary criticism. 

Jane Glaubman

Jane Glaubman (English Literature) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for her dissertation research entitled “Tolkien, Fans, and the Neoliberal Age.” Jane will use this opportunity to conduct interviews, access archives in The Tolkien Society, and visit the Literary Papers collection of the Bodleian Library at Oxford. With the aid of this grant Jane will be able to spend five weeks in U.K. in hopes that her research will illuminate the relationship between the written and word and mass culture from the 1940s until the present. 

Matthew Minarchek

Matthew Minarchek (History) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for his proposed research entitled “Defining Terra Incognita: International Nature Protection, Science, and the Production of the Leuser Ecosystem in Sumatra, Indonesia, 1890 – 1950.” With the aid of the grant Matthew will be able to spend ten weeks in U.K., France, and Belgium. This grant enables Matthew to examine the emergence of the international nature protection movement in Europe in the early 20th century, the relationships between each of the participating countries’ members and leaders, the movement’s role in the imperial project, and its impact on the production of space and place in the colonies.  

Anu Pauliina Patana (Government) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for her proposed project entitled “Fear of immigrants, the EU or discontent with ‘Political as usual’? Local-level determinants of support for the far right in Western Europe.” With the aid of this grant Ana will be able to spend seven weeks in Finland and Sweden in hopes that her project will expand on existing scholarship on the rise of the far right by examining local-level variation of far-right parties’ electoral support in elected Western European countries. 

John Mackenzie Pierce

John Mackenzie Pierce (Musicology) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for his proposed research entitled “In the Mirror of Europe: transnational histories of Poland and music, 1930 – 1939.” With the aid of this grant John will be able to spend seven weeks in Poland and France in hopes that his project will give a complement answer to the question “How did internationally oriented artists adapt as the political stability on which their careers depended slowly evaporated across the 1030s?” compared to scholarly focus on western Europe. 

Lia Turtas

Lia Turtas (Italian Studies) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for her dissertation research entitled “The Automaton of Italian Cinema: Towards a Reinterpretation of Humanism in the Age of the Cinematic Apparatus.” With the aid of this grant Lia will be able to spend four weeks in Italy in hopes that her project will make an original contribution towards a post-humanist history of Italian cinema, in the belief that the human dimension of cinema cannot be separated from its non-human counterpart. 

Yen Vu

Yen Vu (French Studies) was awarded the Michele Sicca Research Grant for her proposed research entitled “Vietnamese Expatriates in France in the early 20th Century: revolutionaries, opportunists, and artists.” With the aid of this grant Yen will be able to spend eight weeks in France in hopes that her project will contribute to the evaluation of cultural and political interaction in the colonial context and the understanding of Francophone literature and its developments. 

2015-2016
Caitlin Mastroe

Caitlin Mastroe was awarded the Michele Sicca Grant for her proposed research examining counter-radicalization movements within Western societies. She plans to use this opportunity as the foundation of her dissertation research. With the help of this grant, Caitlin will be able to spend four weeks in the United Kingdom in hopes that her research will ultimately help protect more civilians.

Elizabeth Acorn

Elizabeth Acorn was awarded the Michele Sicca Grant for her proposed doctoral dissertation entitled, “Constructing Compliance: The Impact of Domestic Actors and Institutions in the Anti-Bribery Regime”. Elizabeth will have the opportunity to interview regulators, prosecutors, and legal counsel for multinational corporations in the United States, Canada, France and Germany. With the help of this grant, Elizabeth will be able to spend eight weeks between Paris, Munich, Frankfurt and Karlsruhe in hopes that through her work, transnational regulatory networks that combat foreign bribery are more widely recognized and understood.

Dietmar Friesnegger

Dietmar Friesnegger was awarded the Michele Sicca Grant for his proposed research entitled, “Musical Missions in Mother Russia: Diplomacy Through a Harmonic Lens”. He intends to examine the role of music in the diplomacy of two major periods of conflict in Russia’s history, i.e. the last decades of the reign of Catherine the Great and the decade leading up to World War I. With the aid of this grant, Dietmar will be able to spend up to six weeks in St. Petersburg, Russia conducting research at important Russian institutions.

Benedetta Luciana Sara Carnaghi

Benedetta Luciana Sara Carnaghi was awarded the Michele Sicca Grant for her proposed research entitled, “Comparative History of Double Agents, 1914-1945: from the Italian OVRA to the German Gestapo to the Allied Counterespionage”. Benedetta will have the opportunity to conduct archival research in both Italian and French and compare the activities of intelligence services and the police in different Western European countries during the First and Second World Wars. With the help of this grant, Benedetta will be able to spend eight weeks between Paris and Rome and contribute more analysis to the often secretive and protected topic of espionage.

Lucas Drouhot

Lucas Drouhot was awarded the Michele Sicca Grant for his proposed research examining the effect of spatial segregation on religious identity of Muslim immigrants in France and the relative increase in religiousness of younger Muslim immigrants than their elders in a society that becomes more and more secular. Lucas will have the opportunity to observe different French communities and survey local residents. With the help of this grant, Lucas will be able to spend eight weeks outside of the Paris metropolitan area and will provide precise empirical evidence and explanations to the public debate concerning Muslims in France.

Amanda Lowell

Amanda Lowell was awarded the Michele Sicca Grant for her proposed research examining content patterns in plays of the Flanders and Brabant Chambers of Rhetoric (Rederijkerskamers) from 1400 to 1600. Amanda will be able to place the work of the Chamber’s in a broader European perspective, edit and translate, compile records on a large-scale, and assess the Chambers’ taste and aesthetic. With the aid of the grant, Amanda will have the opportunity to spend over a month in Belgium conducting this research.

Kaja Tally

Kaja Tally was awarded the Michele Sicca Grant to conduct her pre-dissertation research and participate in the Vesuvian Institute’s archaeological excavation at the ancient Roman Villa in San Marco. Kaja will have the opportunity to retrieve and catalog samples of ancient Vesuvian gardens and create a new methodology for past ancient gardens that were not properly excavated. With the aid of this grant, Kaja will be able to spend four weeks in the Bay of Naples in hopes that she, along with other researchers, will be able to create a new source material for the proper excavation of ancient gardens. 

Liana Brent

Liana Brent was awarded the Michele Sicca Grant for her proposed research examining the topic of tomb violation in Roman funerary archaeology. Liana will have the opportunity to collect both published and unpublished archaeological data from regional and annalistic publications, not available in North America. With the help of this grant, Liana will be able to spend up to three months in the British School at Rome conducting her research and co-investigating with the Roman Burial Database.

Kaitlin Pontzer

Kaitlin Pontzer was awarded the Michele Sicca Grant for her proposed research examining the wives of prisoners condemned to death in England and Scotland throughout the late 17th century and the 18th century. In her own words, “This work will contribute substantially to my primary source material as I begin work on my dissertation”. With this grant, Kaitlin will be able to spend four weeks in London and Edinburgh to piece back together the lives of the women affected by the condemnation of their spouses.

2014-2015
Hannah Byland

Hannah Byland (Medieval Studies) was awarded a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research on her project, which focuses on the Ancrene Wisse and its source texts (the Glossa Ordinaria and Lombard’s Epistles on Paul). She plans to spend about four weeks in the United Kingdom at the Bodleian Library and the British Library (Oxford and London). She hopes this work will, in her own words, “unravel some of the mysteries that have accrued over the centuries.”

Michael Bartel

Michael Bartel (History) was awarded a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research on his project, “The Return of History: International Finance and the End of the Cold War”. He will not only be examining the relationship between structures and historical outcomes, but also what mixture of events and struggles that led to the conclusion of the Cold War. He plans to spend four weeks in Kew, England and Switzerland at the National Archives of the United Kingdom and the Bank of International Settlements, respectively.

Kyle Anderson

Kyle Anderson (Near Eastern Studies) was awarded a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research on his project, “Life During Wartime: Peasants, Politics, and the Colonial State in Egypt”. He will be researching how British policy and influence in Egypt at this time affected the 1919 rebellions. He plans to spend three months in London, England at the British National Archives in the War Office and Foreign Office archives.

Nathan Taylor

Nathan Taylor (German Studies) was awarded a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research on his project, “Stories of the System: Capital’s Representation in Crisis”. This dissertation project will be exploring the relationship between contemporary literature and financial capitalism. He plans to spend six weeks in Frankfurt, Germany, mainly, at the Money Museum of Germany’s Central Bank. He will also be visiting the literary archive in Marbach, the archive of the Commerzbank AG and the archive of the Deutsche Bank, and the German National Library. 

Ji Young Kim

Ji Young Kim (Musicology) was awarded a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research on her project, “Instrumental Writing in Robert Schumann’s Late Music”. With the Michele Sicca Grant, Kim will be able to analyze unpublished documents in the archives that she will visit. She plans to spend four weeks in Berlin at the Heinrich Heine-Institut, Universitat-und Landesbibliothek Bonn, Robert Schumann Haus, and the Berlin Staatsbibliothek.

Natalia Di Pietrantonio

Natalia Di Pietrantonio (History of Art) a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research on her project, entitled, “Visions of Desire: Awadhi Visual Culture”. She plans to spend about five weeks in Paris, France at the Bibliotheque Nationale. Her work will examine, “…European and the local Nawabi rulers investment in and consumption of Awadhi erotic paintings during the 18th and 19th centuries.”

2013-2014

Ophélie Chavaroche (Romance Studies/French) was awarded a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research on her project, which in her own words "lies at the intersection of literature and the history of medicine, with a strong emphasis on the literary and artistic aspect of medical discourses on women's sick or pregnant bodies in seventeenth century France." She plans to conduct her research at archives in Paris over the summer.

Sylvia Hakopian

Sylvia Hakopian (Romance Studies) was awarded a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research on her project, "Children's Utopia / Fascist Utopia: Ideology and Reception of Children's Textbooks Under Italian Fascism." Basing her research at the University of Macerata’s Centro di documentazione e ricerca sulla storia del libro scolastico e della letteratura per l’infanzia in Italy, Sylvia intends to build on previous research written on children and education under Fascism while also considering how "a child's age, gender, social status, geographic location, or emotional and mental development [may] prevent him or her to grasp and respond to the images conveyed in such didactic materials as textbooks."

David Israelachvili (History) was awarded a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research on his project, which specializes in the history of interwar Austria (and focuses on the intellectual movements of figures such as Max Adler and Otto Bauer). He plans to spend four weeks in Amsterdam at the Institute of Social History and another four weeks in Vienna to carry out his research.

Jacob Krell

Jacob Krell (History) was awarded a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research on his project, "Rebirthing the New: A Conceptual History of Imagination and Invention in French Thought, 1900-1970." During his proposed six week stay in France, he plans to spend part of his time researching at various archives, including the Jean-Sartre Archive, the National Archives, and the Intitut mémoires de l'édition contemporaine.

Ruth Mullett

Ruth Mullett (Medieval Studies) was awarded a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research on her project, "The South English Legendary Prologue." This project coincides with her pre-dissertation research (which focuses on Middle English literature and paleography) which will be carried out this summer at various institutions such as the Bodleian Library, the British Library, and Cambridge University (UK).

Emily Oliver

Emily Oliver (Creative Writing/Poetry) was awarded a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research on her project, "A Map of Voices: Contemporary Poets and Storytellers of Ireland." She plans to spend time in Ireland this summer recording audio poems, stories and essays and to interview contemporary Irish writers.

Fascundo Vega

Facundo Vega (Comparative Literature) was awarded a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research on his project, "The Fascination with the Exceptional: Politics and Life-in-Common after Martin Heidegger." He plans to do archival and on-site research this summer in Germany, namely at the Deutsches Literaturarchiv Marbach and the Goethe-Universität (Frankfurt am Main).

Mariam Wassif

Mariam Wassif (English) was awarded a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research on her project, which in her own words aims "to explore the ways in which clothing disrupts the notion of bodily integrity by compensating for defects in an organism that ought to be wholey perfect." This relates to her dissertation (tentatively entitled "Fashioning the body: Clothing and Corporality in Romanticism"), which will examine "images of dress and nakedness in British and French Romanticism." She plans to continue this research with a Sicca grant this summer in Paris, where she will be conducting both archival and on-site research.

2012-2013

Corinna Matlis (Medieval Studies) was awarded a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research on her project, "Eleventh Century Norman Social Networks."

Kavita Singh (Comparative Literature) was awarded a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research on her project, "Creole in France: Performing Antillean Language and Culture in and Against the Metropole."

Katrina Nousek (German Studies) was awarded a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research on her project, "Past with Futures: Subjectivity and Temporality in Contemporary Literature by Herta Muller and Zsuzsa Bank."

Kristen Streahle

Kristen Streahle (History of Art & Visual Studies) was awarded a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research on her project examining the fourteenth-century palace, Palazzo Chiaramonte-Steri, with its painted ceiling, and to research other cultural heritage sites in Italy.

Alyshia Ledlie

Alyshia Ledlie (History) was awarded a Michele Sicca Grant to conduct research in the British Library on the 17th & 18th century politician, William Brockman.