Fountain of Cibeles | Madrid, Spain
Jacob In
January 25, 2015

Robcis writes:

The response to Charlie Hebdo shows French republicanism’s blindness to structural racism.

A few days after the horrific attacks that left seventeen dead in the offices of Charlie Hebdo, in a kosher supermarket, and in the streets of Paris, the prime minister of France, Manuel Valls, declared war on “terrorism, jihadism, and radical Islam.”

The Center for the Study of Social Movements at the University of Notre Dame is very pleased to announce that the winner of the 2015 John D. McCarthy Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Scholarship of Social Movements and Collective Behavior is Sidney Tarrow.

The award not only recognizes Sid’s extraordinary achievements in research, but also the role that he has played in mentoring successive generations of scholars.

Transatlantic Academy
January 14, 2015

It has been more than a year since a series of turbulent events started in Ukraine that dramatically changed not only the country’s course but also the broader geopolitical situation in Europe’s eastern neighborhood.

When taking stock of the difficult situation in Ukraine by early 2015, two daunting challenges stand out: its loss of territorial integrity with the annexation of Crimea and an ongoing military conflict in the country’s east, and its dire economic situation.

CNN - Op Ed
January 10, 2015

Responding to the massacre at the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, President Barack Obama and other public figures such as John Kerry, author Salman Rushdie -- even the far-right nationalist French politician Marine Le Pen -- have defended the right to freedom of expression as a core democratic value. Huge demonstrations in solidarity with the victims are occurring throughout France and in many European capitals.

The slogan "Je suis Charlie Hebdo" is circulating widely in social media. Twitter is inundated with tweets about the political power of satire. Pictures of demonstrators holding pens in the air abound.

 

by Kathy Hovis
Cornell Chronicle
 

Students interested in language study have two new options to choose from – Wolof and Zulu – and starting in fall of 2015, they may have three more: Punjabi, Ukrainian and Hungarian.

Those languages join 52 ancient and modern languages offered at Cornell, some through traditional courses and others through the Shared Course Initiative, a collaboration with Yale and Columbia universities, where students can join classes at any of the three campuses via live videoconferences. All language classes are offered through the College of Arts and Sciences.

APPLY ONLINE NOW FOR CORNELL IN TURIN STUDY ABROAD 2015!

The Cornell in Turin Summer Study Abroad is designed for students who wish to learn about European politics and society, with a special focus on Italy, by immersing themselves in a city rich with history and culture. From italian gastronomy to culture and arts, this program provides the students with the opportunity to experience the italian way of life!

The courses are conducted in English, so no knowledge of Italian is required. The program is open to all majors and students from outside cornell are also welcome to apply.